Sunshine Blog

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 photo credit: Patrick Brosset via photopin cc

Ah it seems I have caught the sunshine blog post bug. Like many I have been watching it float around on Twitter and have enjoyed reading the posts that have emerged. So here goes my sunshine blog post!

Here is how it works:

  1. Acknowledge the nominating blogger.
  2. Share 11 random facts about yourself.
  3. Answer the 11 questions the nominating blogger has created for you.
  4. List 11 bloggers. They should be bloggers you believe deserve some recognition and a little blogging love!
  5. Post 11 questions for the bloggers you nominate to answer and let all the bloggers know they have been nominated. (You cannot nominate the blogger who nominated you.)

Nominating Blogger (s)

I have been nominated by two people and will give them both a shout out! The first blogger is Dana Ariss @Danaariss. I first ‘met’ Dana on one of the many Twitter chats I take part in. (For the life of me I can’t remember which one).  I got to know Dana better as part of the planning committee for the new #cdnedchat. She is enthusiastic and bubbly person from whom I have learned lots!

The second blogger that nominated me was Jennifer Collette @Jennmarieco. I had the great privilege of working with Jenn last year. We spent the whole year bouncing ideas off of each other, planning and co-teaching together. It was an incredible experience and although we do not work in the same building anymore I find that not much has changed. We still challenge each others thinking, discuss what we are teaching and make each other laugh on a consistent basis. She is a wickedly awesome person!

11 Random Facts

1) I have lived in three countries so far: South Africa, Swaziland and Canada 🙂

2) I am a cat person.

3) Winter is my favourite season.

4) I read a lot of fantasy novels. I am kind of stuck in the genre.

5) I am self-conscious about my writing but blog to help me get better. (It’s working!)

6) It takes me a long time to make a decision. I need to think about things and tend to sit on the fence for a long time.

7) I love salt and vinegar chips.

8) My favourite T.V. show is Star Trek.

9) I don’t really like chocolate or ice cream.

10) I have 3 bachelor degrees and am currently working on my Masters of Education. (Yay learning!)

11) I  am an introvert. I am quiet and like to listen to others speak. I usually only speak in a group once I have thought about my response. I also tend to get stage fright be it in front of  a group of 5 or 100 people.

Questions from Jenn and Dana:

1. Why did you start blogging? I was bored while doing my education degree and wanted to push my thinking further that what my classes were providing. Blogging has helped me think deeply about what, why and how I am teaching. It has really changed my world.

2. What do you love doing the most? Teaching. Nothing makes me happier and feel more challenged.

3.  What is your favourite educational quote? “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” Nelson Mandela

4.  What would you do if you weren’t a teacher? I’d probably be in HR or be a botanist.

5. What do you think makes a great teacher? Someone who is passionate, curious and isn’t willing to accept the status quo.

6.  What is your favourite educational website? Hmmmm tough one… www.theliteracyshed.com. It has great videos and resources!

7.  What is the funniest thing a student ever told you? Tough one. None spring to mind but everyday is filled with laughs when teaching.

8.  What is your favourite movie? The Day After Tomorrow. It’s terrible but I love watching it on cold Winnipeg winter days, makes it feel very doomsday-y

9.  How often do you blog? Anywhere from twice a week to once every three months. It all depends on what is going on and what is on my mind.

10.  Why do you love twitter? I get to talk to many different educators that I would otherwise never have been able to talk to. It’s really opened my world up.

11.  What are you looking forward to in 2014? Getting married to the love of my life 🙂

1. Why teaching? I love learning and helping others learn is one of the most satisfying things on earth. Teaching also challenges me everyday to become better at what I do.

2. Who or what is your  greatest inspiration? Nelson Mandela. He showed my home country the power of forgiveness and the importance of equality.

3. What is one new thing you have tried this year? I applied and successfully presented at a conference. Wohoo!

4. What would your ideal day look like? Sleep until 10am and then teach.

5. Who was the best teacher you ever had and why? I have been blessed with many incredible teachers that there are too many to choose from. Probably my grade 2 teacher Mrs Webster. She was a kind, caring teacher who never raised her voice. She is the reason I promise my students I will never yell at them. (They have noticed that I don’t yell and appreciate it).

6. If you could live anywhere in the world other than where you currently live, where would it be? Probably back in South Africa. There is no place like home.

7.  What is something you are looking forward to in 2014? Becoming a better teacher and learning lots.

8.  Are you an early bird or a night owl? Night owl.

9.  What is your favourite band or music artist? I like Rise Against. It’s pretty good music to write your report cards to.

10. Why Twitter? It opens up your world. Nothing more incredible than having a respectful and insightful conversation on Twitter. It has changed the way I teach.

11. Mac or PC? Android or iPhone? Mac. It all works so nicely together.

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photo credit: Leo Reynolds via photopin cc

11 Bloggers I want to nominate (In no particular order)

1) Aviva Dunsigner @Avivaloca

2) Maria Popova  @brainpicker

3) Dean Shareski @shareski

4) George Couros @gcouros

5) John Spencer @edrethink

6) Pernille Ripp @Pernilleripp

7) Tanis Thiessen @tjthiessen

8) Darren Kuropatwa @dkuropatwa

9) Hybrid Pedegogy @hybridped (Amazing blog! You must read it!)

10) William Chamberlain @wmchamberlain

11) Mrs T @MissLwbt

11 Questions for your nominees:

1)  If you could teach any grade/age what would it be and why?

2) What would you dream classroom look like?

3) What is the 1 thing you hope your students gain from your teaching?

4) What book would you recommend to a teacher needing some inspiration?

5) Whiteboard & projector or Smartboard?

6) How do you inspire creativity in your students and colleagues?

7) What is the first thing you’d purchase if you won the lottery?

8) What has Twitter and blogging done for your teaching?

9) What is 1 thing we can all do to be better teachers tomorrow?

10)  Best teaching memory.

11) Quiet classroom or noisy classroom? Why?

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The Importance of the Dissident Voices in the Classroom

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Time to walk like a rebel photo credit: Ian Sane via photopin cc

We all have them in our classrooms. Those voices that are constantly asking questions. They ask questions like: ‘What are we doing next?  Why are we doing this? How should be do it? When will we be able to move onto the next step? What if…?’ Sometimes these questions can be overwhelming and you wish that they would be silent. If they would simply quieten down and not ask so many questions you think we could easily move through ‘the plan’. Thoughts like this can be tempting, however, as my dad always says “It’s a child’s job  to ask questions. If  they stop asking questions you know you’re in trouble”. This is a simple truth that I think is often forgotten in schools. In order to maintain calm and order, we like students to quietly comply with our plan for them and simply accept the status quo. “This is what you have to learn and this is how we are going to do it.”

Are these really traits we want in our students? Acceptance and apathy in regards to what they are learning and their education? I know I don’t want that for them. I  want to help my students learn how to question the process but do so in a meaningful and constructive manner. I want them to ask questions about what they are learning because it needs to be relevant to them. As their teacher I need to help them see why it is important to learn certain things even if they can be a bit boring and tedious at times.  I use their questions about their learning, to question why I am doing what I am doing and what purpose it has. If I do not have a good answer as to why we are doing something a certain way, I need to stop and think critically about what I am doing. Each and every one of these questions help me become a better teacher. And I hope it helps my students become critical thinkers who will never stop asking questions and  hopefully help them fearlessly change the world.

So next time one of your dissident voices asks a question, listen closely to what they are saying and help them begin to see their world differently.

Writing Takes Time. Forget the Rush.

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Cause I’d rather pretend I’d still be there at the end.photo credit: Βethan via photopin cc

Oh my what a busy start to the year it has been. In the blitz that September and October have been we have fully launched our students blogs. Blogging is a learning process for all of us. From what standard of writing we expect on our blogs to the simple mechanics of how to post to your blog. My students have embraced blogging and are enjoying writing for an authentic audience. I had to chuckle one day when one of my students said “You know, blogging is better than writing in my notebook because now I know someone is actually reading it.” Wow, talk about getting it and being motivated by it.

On Friday I was talking to a good teacher friend of mine who asked “When are you going to write your next blog post?”. I was a bit stunned. I have 3 drafts I am working on but they aren’t quite there yet. Some of my posts take months to write simply because I need to think things through. Others, like this one, I can whip out in under an hour.

Her question also made me think about my students. Some have written over 10 posts since getting their blogs 2 weeks ago. Others have only written the 2 posts I asked them to write for me.  I suspect some of my students are writing their blog posts quickly and in one shot. Tomorrow I want to talk to them about how writing takes time and not to fear if they can’t write a long essay in under an hour. Writing is a skill and it is something that they are learning to do well and efficiently.

I as their teacher, also want to remember that writing takes time. We all need to remember that it is okay to take a bit longer on something to ensure that we deliver a good product. It’s time to forget the rush, slow down and take our time.

A Culture of Share

Yesterdays Blackboard Collaborate #etmooc session “Sharing is Accountability” was one of the most interesting sessions thus far in the #etmooc course and has really gotten me thinking. I also read Max’s post “What I’ve learnt so far: the meaning of ‘sharing’ ‘which got the cogs turning even more.

  origin_4464982807photo credit: denise carbonell via photopin cc

It would seem that we have entered the age of a culture of share. Go on almost any website and you will find a button that says ‘share this”. The culture of share is ever present among educators on Twitter and educational blogs. There is also a healthy culture of dialogue, critiquing and collaboration in these communities. I see my students taking this culture of share one step further and entering the stage of share and remix. The remix often helps them find their voices when they are struggling to find it on their own. (Perhaps a blogpost for another time…?)

Being a new teacher I have am blessed to have found the culture of share’that is out there on Twitter, Pinterest and even amoung  colleagues in my building. My own fondness for sharing didn’t start until the first few months of pursuit of my education degree after I realized that this was a profession where living in ones own bubble can lead to a feeling of isolation and disillusion quickly. At fist I started small, sharing and working with people in my cohort and moved into the world of Twitter where sharing is the norm for many educators using the service. Being exposed to so many people so willing to share helped me realize sharing is something I value as a professional. I do not share because I expect anything in return but rather I share because it brings me joy and helps me become a better teacher.  Sharing ideas with colleagues in my building has helped me refine them and make them better to serve my students.

Some people are overwhelmed by the amount of information and resources out there and sometimes come off as not wanting to share and participate. Some simply aren’t open to sharing.  (When people say they don’t share because they don’t get anything in return when they share always reminds me of the principle of reciprocity from my first year social psych course. Oh the things that stick!)

Anyone who has tried to explain the awesomeness of Twitter for PD or emailed a few links gleaned from your Twitter stream knows the looks you get that can range from “this is cool” to “this is too much information to for me to handle” in no time at all. After experiencing the dazed looks a few too many times I have learned to tone down my ‘sharing’ and to keep it to my Tweets, Pinterest and my blogposts. That way people an choose to filter and choose what they would like to look at and use. When people ask where an idea or resource that I found on Twitter…. all bets are off and I go into share mode.

How do you share with your colleagues and peers? Are you scared to share?

 

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Live, Learn, Lead photo credit: ljperales via photopin cc