It need not be perfect..

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 Public Order photo credit: Tal Bright via photopin cc

As a teacher it is quite easy to become sucked into the  vortex creative teacher sites that show endless pictures of cutesy bulletin boards and other classroom decorating ideas. You know what I am talking about, images that make you think over spring break you really can and should, collect and convert milk crates into reading chairs. Or a beautiful set of book marks you can create with your kids in a snap. One of the things you will often see online is beautiful bulletin boards that have amazing borders, colour coordinated backgrounds and fancy fonts. Things that seem like they could go up in any store for display. These beautiful exhibitions as lovely as they look, always seem a bit too perfect, too pretty, and dare I say are often lacking something quite important: that touch that lets you know that it really was made by a child in the process of learning.

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As a result, the combination of my strong feelings and only so many hours in a day, my bulletin boards often look,  how do I say this nicely, a little rough around the edges. (Who has time to put up borders and create these elaborate displays?!) They look like kids created them, because well they did. They look like we are using them to learn, because we are, we leave notes on our boards to help connect our learning. Yes we still use store-bought posters but these are used in connection to what we are currently working on. They are works in progress. The work isn’t perfect, it isn’t a competition to see who can produce the most beautiful stuff, it’s our learning and we are proud of it. So next time you ask a child to redo a piece of work for display ask yourself: ‘Does it really need to be perfect?’

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P.S. I should probably add that we do create beautiful pieces that we proudly display. But they all have those distinct marks that a child has made them.

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