Changing Landscapes: Teachers As Knowmads Part 1

Knowmad

 “Rider” photo credit: h.koppdelaney via photopin cc

Over spring break I happened to come across a Tweet on my Twitter stream about an interesting book to check out (Knowmad Society). Little did I know that I wouldn’t be able to put this book down until I had finished it. Some of the ideas proposed in the book have profound implications on societal and educational systems. One of the most interesting concepts of the book was that of a Knowmad.

Knowmads: 

1. Are not restricted to a specific age.

2. Build their personal knowledge through explicit information gathering and tacit experiences, and leverage their personal knowledge to produce new ideas.

3. Are able to contextually apply their ideas and expertise in various social and organizational configurations.

4. Are highly motivated to collaborate, and are natural networks, navigating new organizations, cultures and societies.

5. Purposively use new technologies to help them solve problems and transcend geographical limitations.

6. Are open to sharing what they know, and invite and support open access to information, knowledge and expertise from others.

7. Can unlearn as quickly as they learn, adopting new ideas and practices as necessary.

8. Thrive in non-hierarchical networks and organizations.

9. Develop habits of mind and practice to learn continuously.

10. Are not afraid of failure.

Page  24 of Knowmad Society

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Australia, Adelaide; Light on the waters photo credit: kool_skatkat via photopin cc

As I thought more and more about the concept of what a Knowmad is, I began to think about how vital it is for educators to embrace the notion of being a Knowmad. We are entering job hunting season across Canada and the U.S. There are new teachers graduating from Ed faculties and experienced teachers simply looking to make a change all on the job search. It’s a stressful time for those looking for employment in such a tight market where nothing is guaranteed.

Many of the points in the definition of a Knowmad remind me of my Twitter PLN and the fantastic educators I have connected with. We work together, share ideas and are always willing to help  each other regardless of location. The relationships and interactions afforded by our online and offline networks allow us gain new knowledge and to apply it in our classrooms the very next day. We are always learning and trying new things out. Having a supportive network has allowed me to gain the courage to try things and to not fear failure.

I am still pondering the idea of teachers as Knowmads and many of thoughts shared in Knowmad Society.  Once I have pondered some more I will write-up another blog post.

What do you think of the idea of teachers as Knowmads?

Interesting Articles to Read:

“What I am Afraid of” by Ben Grey http://bengrey.com/blog/2013/03/what-im-afraid-of/

“Stop Following Your Passions.. the Celebration of Work” by Dean Shareski

http://ideasandthoughts.org/2012/08/22/stop-following-your-passions-the-celebration-of-work/

“Don’t let your change agents become free agents” by Natalie Foley http://smartblogs.com/leadership/2013/03/29/dont-let-your-change-agents-become-free-agents/

“How managers can keep their top talet.” by Maynard Webb https://smartblogs.com/leadership/2013/02/27/how-managers-can-keep-their-top-talent/

“How to innovate like a Jedi knight” by Diego Rodriguez  http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20130328222915-5935179-how-to-innovate-like-a-jedi-knight

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4 thoughts on “Changing Landscapes: Teachers As Knowmads Part 1

  1. I’m enjoying making my way through “Knowmad Society” a little bit at a time – there is so much to ponder!

    Personally I like the idea of teachers as knowmads. If teachers can embrace the characteristics outlined above they will continue to be relevant as our society changes in the ways outlined in the book.

    Though they might look very different than what we see today, our schools can become places that encourage peer learning, relationship building and community involvement. I hope we pursue the ideals found in democratic schools but I also hope we continue to support publicly funded education so that we can build a society that embraces freedom, responsibility and lifelong learning for all.

  2. Pingback: Teachers as Knowmads: Part 2 | To Teach Is To Learn

  3. Pingback: Changing landscapes: Teachers as knowmads part 1 | Knowmad Society Blog

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